Info:Did you know


Comanche

The horse was a key element in the emergence of a distinctive Comanche culture

Che Guevara

Socialist revolutionary Che Guevara was born in Argentina and received the nickname "Che" because of his frequent use of the Argentine word Che, meaning "pal" or "mate"

Constantine I

Constantine the Great was the first Roman Emperor to accept Christianity

Francisco Goya

Spanish painter Francisco Goya is both the last of the Old Masters and the first of the modern artists

Charles Kingsley

Author Charles Kingsley was one of the first to praise Charles Darwin's book "On the Origin of Species," and seeking a reconciliation between science and Christian doctrine

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2016

Jing Qi Shen

Jing (essence), Qi (breath energy) and Shen (a divine or human spirit) are known as the "Three Treasures" in Daoism

Victor de Riqueti, marquis de Mirabeau

Mirabeau the Elder was known as the "friend of mankind" who believed that the wealth of a nation was its population

Indus River

The Indus is the most important river in Pakistan providing essential water for its economy

Cartoon

The original meaning of "cartoon" comes from the Italian "cartone," meaning "big paper," and referred to a drawing made on paper as a full size study for artwork

Stanford University

Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who created New York’s Central Park, designed the physical plan for Stanford University

Bankruptcy

In the Jewish law there was no provision for bankruptcy; instead, all unpaid debts were canceled every seven years

Pueblo

Pueblos are among the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the US

Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Daniel Patrick Moynihan regarded the breakdown of the family, particularly the black family, as central to the problem of poverty

Constantinople

In the Middle Ages, Constantinople was the richest European city and was known as the "Queen of Cities"

Hel

In Norse Mythology "Hel" refers both to the cold realm inhabited by the dead who died not in battle and the cold deity who rules it

Eagles

The Eagles are the highest-selling American band in U.S. history

Dian Fossey

Dian Fossey is the first known person to be voluntarily contacted by a mountain gorilla

Paul Revere

Paul Revere became a patriotic icon due to the poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "Paul Revere's Ride," which described Revere's midnight ride from Boston to Lexington to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the movements of the Brit

Zanzibar

The archipelago of Zanzibar was a separate state which united with Tanganyika to form Tanzania and still enjoys a high degree of autonomy within the union

Luanda

Luanda is one of several cities that has been called the "Paris of Africa"

Astronomy

Astronomy is one of the few sciences where amateurs can still play an active role

Nelson Rockefeller

Nelson Rockefeller served as governor of New York State from 1959 to 1973 and as the 41st vice president of the United States of America from 1974 to 1977

Space exploration

The first human being in space was Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin in 1961 and the first person to set foot on the moon was American astronaut Neil Armstrong in 1969

Alexander Cartwright

Abner Doubleday was once credited with the invention of baseball, but the story is now considered a myth by sports historians, and Alexander Cartwright is now recognized as the true inventor of baseball.

Clarence Darrow

Clarence Darrow tried two important cases (the Scopes Trial and the Ossian Sweet case) after announcing retirement

John Locke

John Locke believed human beings start life "from scratch," with the mind at birth a "tabula rasa" or blank slate, which is then filled with knowledge through experience

African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968)

The Montgomery Bus Boycott, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was a seminal event in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement

Dravidian peoples

The origin of the Dravidian languages, spoken by over 200 million people located primarily in Southern India, has remained unclear and controversial

Symphony

The form that we now recognize as the symphony took shape in the early eighteenth century

Moai

Scientists have come up with several theories to explain how the Moai of Easter Island "walked" from the quarry to their stone platforms

Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud is commonly referred to as "the father of psychoanalysis"

Inuit

Inuit is a term that encompasses the Indigenous peoples who live in the Arctic regions of Alaska, Greenland, and Canada, and Siberia although some prefer to be called by their own name, such as Kalaallit in Greenland and [[Inupiat]

Althea Gibson

Althea Gibson was the first African-American woman to play on the world tennis tour, winning eleven Grand Slam titles

Eritrea

One of the earliest hominids, dated to over one million years old, was found in Eritrea

Adonis

In Greek mythology Adonis was resurrected by Zeus following his premature earthly death

James Garfield

James Garfield's presidency lasted just 200 days, the second shortest presidency in U.S. history after William Henry Harrison's 31 days

Ursula K. Le Guin

Science fiction author Ursula K. Le Gwin was the daughter of anthropologist Alfred L. Kroeber

Vatican City

Vatican City is the smallest independent nation in the world

Panda

The giant panda is classified as a carnivore but its diet is almost exclusively bamboo