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From New World Encyclopedia


Java

The island of Java has over 100 volcanoes, over 40 of which are active

Thomas Helwys

Thomas Helwys, one of the founders of the Baptist denomination, was a staunch advocate of religious freedom

Family

The UN declared the family the fundamental unit of society and entitled to protection by the State

Toby Riddle

Toby Winema Riddle, one of few Native American women to be so honored, received a military pension by congressional act acknowledging her role as a key participant and mediator during peace and war

Internet

The internet was first conceived of in the 1946 science fiction short story, "A Logic Named Joe"

Igbo People

In the 1960s the Igbo attempted to secede from Nigeria and form the independent Republic of Biafra

Mary I of England

The execution of Protestants during the reign of Queen Mary Tudor earned her the nickname "Bloody Mary"

Fire

Learning to control fire was one of the first great achievements of hominids.

Tempo

Before the invention of the metronome, words were the only way to describe the tempo of a musical composition

United States

Early colonists believed that America had a special role in God's providence

Dian Fossey

Dian Fossey is the first known person to be voluntarily contacted by a mountain gorilla

New Zealand

Maori settlers originally called the North Island of New Zealand "Aotearoa," a name which is now used for the entire country

Battle of Normandy

Bad weather before D-Day gave the Allied troops the element of surprise

Victorian era

The Victorian era was a time of unprecedented population increase in England

Joseph Warren

Joseph Warren died during the Battle of Bunker Hill, fighting in the front lines for the American Revolution

Kimono

"Kimono" in Japanese means "something worn" or "clothes"

Bahadur Shah II

Bahadur Shah II, the last Moghul emperor of India, had little political power and was finally exiled for treason by the British

Surgery

The term "surgery" comes from the Greek "cheirourgia," meaning "hand work"

Confidence game

The term "confidence man" was first used in 1849 about a thief who asked strangers if they had confidence to trust him with their watch

Arranged marriage

Arranged marriages have been employed to unite enemy nations and create a culture of peace

Canada

Canada is the second largest country in the world by total area (including its waters), and the fourth by land area

Biome

The British Empire was known as "the empire on which the sun never sets"

Kiowa

Kiowa ledger art originated from captive Kiowa artists' use of the white man's record keeping books (ledgers) to preserve their history using traditional pictographic representations

Yahweh

Yahweh is the primary Hebrew name of God in the Bible

John Michael Wright

John Michael Wright was commissioned to paint several royal portraits and paintings of aristocracy, but did not receive the title "King's Painter" nor did he receive a knighthood

Balfour Declaration

The Balfour Declaration was described as a 'scrap of paper' that changed history

Vaclav Havel

Václav Havel was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic

Didgeridoo

The didgeridoo is commonly claimed to be the world's oldest wind instrument

Mohawk

As original members of the Iroquois League, or Haudenosaunee, the Mohawk were known as the "Keepers of the Eastern Door" who guarded the Iroquois Confederation against invasion from that direction

Baba Yaga

Baba Yaga's "cabin on chicken legs" may be based on real buildings.

Andersonville prison

Andersonville Prison was notorious for its overcrowding, starvation, disease, and cruelty during the American Civil War

Adultery

In some cultures, adultery was defined as a crime only when a wife had sexual relations with a man who was not her husband; a husband could be unfaithful to his wife without it being considered adultery.

Scientology

Before establishing the Church of Scientology, founder L. Ron Hubbard was a science fiction author

Tsimshian

Tsimshian people of the Pacific Northwest lived on salmon, which were plentiful prior to commercial fishing, and used Western Redcedar for most of their needs

Abiathar

When Abiathar escaped from King Saul and fled to David he brought the sacred ephod, which he used on several occasions to provide David with crucial advice from God

Edward Albee

Edward Albee's most famous play is "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf"

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe achieved independence from Great Britain in 1980, with Robert Mugabe elected as President

Proterozoic

One of the most important events of the Proterozoic was the build up of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon has one of the highest concentrations of hoodoos of any place on Earth.

Hijacking

The term hijacking arose in connection with the seizing of liquor trucks during Prohibition in the United States.

Trimurti

The Trimurti is the Hindu representation of God as Brahma (creator), Vishnu (preserver), and Shiva (destroyer)

Kwakwaka'wakw

Kwakwaka'wakw have made great efforts to revive their traditional culture—their language, dances, masks, totem poles, and the previously outlawed potlatch

Mary Baker Eddy

A central tenet of the Church of Christ, Scientist founded by Mary Baker Eddy is spiritual healing of disease

Naphthalene

Naphthalene is the primary ingredient in mothballs