Info:Did you know


Shinto

Shinto is commonly translated as "the Way of the Gods"

Zhou Dynasty

The Mandate of Heaven, requiring rulers to rule justly, was introduced by the Zhou Dynasty of China

Idi Amin

For his killing of civilians, Idi Amin was called the "Butcher of Uganda," although he preferred to call himself Dada—"Big Daddy"

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was buried with full military honors at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn, New York

Morse Code

Morse code has been in use for more than 160 years — longer than any other electronic encoding system

Centaur

The idea of centaurs may have arisen when non-riding cultures first saw nomads mounted on horses.

Yellow River

The Yellow River is known as the "Mother River of China" and "the Cradle of Chinese Civilization"

Ivy League

The term "Ivy League" came from the ivy plants that cover many of these institutions' buildings

NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) began as a defense against [[Communism

Picts

The Picts - "painted people" - were ancient inhabitants of Scotland who lived north of Hadrian's Wall

Talmud

The Talmud contains the opinions of hundreds of rabbis, often including strong disagreements on many subjects. Like the Bible itself, it can be used to support varying positions on many subjects.

Willie Mays

Willie Mays is the only Major League player to have hit a home run in every inning from the first through the sixteenth. He finished his career with a record 22 extra-inning home runs.

Charles Dickens

Most of Dickens' major novels were first written in installments in journals and later reprinted in book form

Holocaust

The Jews of Europe were the main victims of the Holocaust in what the Nazis called the "Final Solution of the Jewish Question"

Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh wrote over 600 letters to his brother Theo

Pueblo Indians

The Pueblo Indians successfully revolted against Spanish colonization in the seventeenth century. Although this success lasted only 12 years it deterred the Spanish from attempts to eradicate their culture and religion.

John Locke

John Locke believed human beings start life "from scratch," with the mind at birth a "tabula rasa" or blank slate, which is then filled with knowledge through experience

Subhas Chandra Bose

Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose was an ardent admirer of Mahatma Gandhi despite their differences

Supreme Court of the United States

The US Supreme Court convened for the first time on February 2, 1790.

Antoinette Brown Blackwell

Antoinette Brown Blackwell was the first woman to be ordained as a Christian minister in the United States

Cyril Burt

Cyril Burt claimed that individual differences in intelligence were innate

Mourning

The color of deepest mourning among medieval European queens was white rather than black

Recorder (music)

The recorder, originally popular in Medieval music, was revived in the twentieth century

Abortion

In 1920 under Vladimir Lenin the Soviet Union was the first to legalize all abortions, but this was reversed in 1936 by Joseph Stalin in order to increase population growth.

Dogen

Dogen studied Zen Buddhism in China and then spread the teachings and practice of Zen meditation in Japan

Kiowa

Kiowa ledger art originated in the captive Kiowa artists' use of the white man's record keeping books (ledgers) to preserve their history using traditional pictographic representations

Australian Aborigine

Before the arrival of the British there were at least 300,000, and possibly 1 million, Indigenous Australians living in Australia

Social work

Social work as a profession emerged in the nineteenth century in response to societal problems that resulted from the social and economic upheaval brought about by the Industrial Revolution

Nation-state

A nation-state is a political entity (sovereign state) that governs a cultural entity (nation) by successfully serving all its citizens

Italian Fascism

The term "Fascism" derives from fasces, a bundle of rods used in the Roman Empire to symbolize strength through unity

Veil of Veronica

The Veil of Veronica is said to have an imprint of the face of Jesus, imprinted on the cloth when Saint Veronica wiped the sweat of his face on the way to Calvary

Joseph Warren

Joseph Warren died during the Battle of Bunker Hill, fighting in the front lines for the American Revolution

Tsimshian

Tsimshian people of the Pacific Northwest lived on salmon, which were plentiful prior to commercial fishing, and used Western Redcedar for most of their needs

Adultery

In some cultures, adultery was defined as a crime only when a wife had sexual relations with a man who was not her husband; a husband could be unfaithful to his wife without it being considered adultery.

Albania

The capital and largest city of Albania is Tirana

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight "Ike" Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States, from 1953 until 1961

Mother's Day

Mother's Day is celebrated on different days in almost every month throughout the world.

Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham, jurist, philosopher, legal and social reformer, and English gentleman, is regarded as the founder of modern Utilitarianism

Naphthalene

Naphthalene is the primary ingredient in mothballs

Clarence Darrow

Clarence Darrow tried two important cases (the Scopes Trial and the Ossian Sweet case) after announcing retirement