Info:Did you know


Sunshine policy

The "Sunshine Policy" of South Korea towards North Korea was named after Aesop's fable in which the man removed his coat voluntarily to enjoy the warmth of the sun

Urbanization

Urbanization can be planned or organic.

Fujian

Many famous teas originate from Fujian, including oolong, Wuyi Yancha, Bai Hao Yinzhen (Silver needle) white tea, and Fuzhou jasmine tea

Christmas Island

Christmas Island was uninhabited until the late nineteenth century and so has many unique species of fauna and flora that evolved independently of human interference

Aurangzeb

During his reign Aurangzeb expanded the Mughal Empire and enacted a series of edicts based on Sharia (Islamic law) in India

Petroglyph

Petroglyphs, or rock engravings, have been found dating back at least 10,000 years

Mary I of Scotland

Mary, Queen of Scots became queen when she was six days old, and died by beheading, convicted of treason against England as part of a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I

Kitty Wells

Kitty Wells' 1952 recording of "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" led to the introduction of female stars in the male-dominated country music genre

Battle of Vicksburg

The Confederate surrender at Vicksburg is sometimes considered the turning point of the American Civil War

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire was the center of interactions between Asia and Europe for six centuries

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Sergei Rachmaninoff had piano roll recordings made of many of his performances

Pop music

Pop music is generally understood to be commercially recorded music with the goal of having mass audience appeal, with the result that its style changes significantly depending on the time and place

Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh wrote over 600 letters to his brother Theo

A. S. Neill

Scottish educator A. S. Neill founded Summerhill School as an experiment in free learning

Lidice

The village of Lidice was destroyed and its people killed in retribution for the killing of one of Hitler's leaders

Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel refused to write or talk about his experiences in the Holocaust for 10 years after his liberation

Wahhabism

Wahhabism subscribes to the doctrine of oneness of God ("Tawhid"), rejecting aspects of contemporary Islam as polytheism

Medicine wheel

The term "medicine wheel" was first applied to the Big Horn medicine wheel in Wyoming

Jesse and Frank James

Jesse and Frank James rarely robbed passengers on the trains they held up

Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary

The Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary in Belize was founded as the first wilderness sanctuary for the jaguar

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia is sometimes called "The Land of The Two Holy Mosques" in reference to Mecca and Medina

Imhotep

Imhotep is considered the founder of Egyptian medicine

Atlantis

There have been dozens—perhaps hundreds—of locations proposed for Atlantis

Kolkata

In 2001 the name of the Indian city of Kolkata was officially changed from "Calcutta"

Nobel Prize

Mahatma Gandhi never received the Nobel Peace Prize, though he was nominated for it five times

Bhimbetka rock shelters

The rock shelters and caves of Bhimbetka contain numerous cave paintings which depict the lives of the people who lived there over periods spanning thousands of years

Nineveh

Nineveh was the largest city in the world prior to its destruction in 612 B.C.E.

Italian Fascism

The term "Fascism" derives from fasces, a bundle of rods used in the Roman Empire to symbolize strength through unity

Aikido

Aikido can be understood as "the way of spiritual harmony" and a path to peace

Structural engineering

Structural engineering has advanced significantly through the study of structural failures

Juvenile delinquency

Juvenile offenders are generally treated more in terms of reform than punishment with the result that probation, or suspended sentencing, is common

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein is considered the greatest scientist of the twentieth century and was named "Person of the Century" by TIME magazine

Maasai

Traditionally the Maasai measured wealth in terms of cattle

Penobscot

The town of Orono in Maine takes its name from the great Penobscot chief or sagamore, Joseph Orono

Antarctica

Antarctica has no indigenous population, no government and belongs to no country

Biome

The British Empire was known as "the empire on which the sun never sets"

Edward VII of the United Kingdom

King Edward VII was known as the "uncle of Europe" as he was related to nearly every other European monarch

Cold War

Walter Lippmann was the first to bring the phrase "Cold War" into common use with the publication of his 1947 book of the same name

George Jones

George Jones and Tammy Wynette recorded many hit duets that made the couple the undisputed king and queen of country music

Kalash

The Kalash people of North-Western Pakistan are a small non-Muslim ethnic group with a very different culture from those surrounding them