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Aristotle

Aristotle believed that human nature is inherently political since individuals cannot achieve happiness without forming states (political bodies) because the individual in isolation is not self-sufficient

Judo

Despite the meaning of "judo" being "the gentle way," it is very demanding and injury can easily occur

Talmud

The Talmud contains the opinions of hundreds of rabbis, often including strong disagreements on many subjects. Like the Bible itself, it can be used to support varying positions on many subjects.

Willie Mays

Willie Mays is the only Major League player to have hit a home run in every inning from the first through the sixteenth. He finished his career with a record 22 extra-inning home runs.

Genesis

Many of the stories from Genesis are retold in the Qur'an

Johann Jakob Bachofen

Johann Jakob Bachofen's seminal work Mother Right presented a radically new view of the role of women in a broad range of ancient societies

Diego Velázquez

Paintings of Diego Velázquez, Spanish artist of the Baroque period, were recreated by several twentieth century painters, including Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali, in their own style

Charles Kingsley

Author Charles Kingsley was one of the first to praise Charles Darwin's book "On the Origin of Species," and seeking a reconciliation between science and Christian doctrine

Saint Bernadette

Saint Bernadette Soubirous, patron saint of sick persons and of Lourdes in France, was a simple shepherd girl

Zerubbabel

Zerubbabel rebuilt the Temple in Jerusalem when the Israelites returned from exile in Babylon

Philosophy

Until the Renaissance, 'philosophy' and 'science' were considered the same discipline.

Akbar the Great

Akbar the Great, leader of the Moghul Empire, fostered pluralism and tolerance for all religions

Tipi

For the Plains Indians, the tipi was more than just a home—it was a sacred space.

Tower of London

Legend says that if the six resident ravens ever leave the Tower of London, the Tower and the British kingdom will fall

Ming Dynasty

The Great Wall of China was built primarily during the Ming Dynasty (1368 to 1644)

Posidonius

The Greek polymath Posidonius attempted to create a unified worldview, showing the interconnectedness of the world and how all forces have an effect on each other and on human life

George Jones

George Jones and Tammy Wynette recorded many hit duets that made the couple the undisputed king and queen of country music

Constructivist architecture

Constructivist architects aimed to instill the avant-garde in everyday life, constructing the spaces in which a socialist utopia could be achieved

Dybbuk

Belief in dybbuks, souls of the dead that attach themselves to living persons on earth, became widespread in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries

Tuscarora (tribe)

After conflict with European settlers the Tuscarora left their lands in North Carolina and settled in New York where they became the sixth tribe to join the Iroquois Confederacy

Buckingham Palace

The first British monarch to live in Buckingham Palace was Queen Victoria

Reserve Officers' Training Corps

ROTC in the United States began in 1916 with the passage of the National Defense Act that was intended to increase "preparedness" prior to the American entry into World War I.

Neoclassical Music

Neoclassical music emerged as a reaction to romanticism with a return to the order and emotional restraint of classical music following the ferment of the First World War

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth I, whose reign is called the Elizabethan era or the Golden Age, ruled England during a period of political and religious turmoil and set her nation's course to become the leading Protestant world power for the next three centuries

Tina Turner

Tina Turner was born in Nutbush, Tennessee, a small rural community that she described in her 1973 hit song "Nutbush City Limits"

Haida

The Haida people are well known as skilled artisans of wood, metal, and design

Margaret Thatcher

A Soviet newspaper gave Margaret Thatcher the nickname "Iron Lady," which she enjoyed as it reflected her uncompromising politics and steadfast leadership

Fujian

Many famous teas originate from Fujian, including oolong, Wuyi Yancha, Bai Hao Yinzhen (Silver needle) white tea, and Fuzhou jasmine tea

David Livingstone

David Livingstone, the first European to see it, renamed the Mosi-oa-Tunya waterfall the Victoria Falls in honor of Queen Victoria

Industrial agriculture

Most of the meat, dairy, eggs, fruits, and vegetables available in supermarkets are produced using industrial agriculture

Picts

The Picts - "painted people" - were ancient inhabitants of Scotland who lived north of Hadrian's Wall

Chickasaw

The Chickasaw were one of the "Five Civilized Tribes" who adopted practices of European Americans but were then forcibly removed to the Indian Territory during the era of Indian Removal

Vaishnavism

Vaishnavism differs from other traditions of Hinduism by recognizing Vishnu as the supreme deity

Methuselah

Methuselah is famous for having lived 969 years, according to the Bible, a lifespan much beyond current human longevity and thus the subject of much speculation

Gospel of Thomas

The Gospel of Thomas emphasizes salvation through understanding the words of Jesus

Yurt

Yurts have been a distinctive feature of life for nomads living on the steppes of Central Asia for at least three thousand years

Felix Adler (professor)

Felix Adler founded the Society for Ethical Culture, a nontheistic religious movement

Solomon Asch

Solomon Asch's experiments uncovered the tendency to conform among many people, but they also revealed the existence of independence in the face of erroneous group opinion.

Jujutsu

Jujutsu means "gentle art" and is rooted in the ancient cultural traditions of Japan

Abortion

In 1920 under Vladimir Lenin the Soviet Union was the first to legalize all abortions, but this was reversed in 1936 by Joseph Stalin in order to increase population growth.

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