Info:Did you know


Moai

Scientists have come up with several theories to explain how the Moai of Easter Island "walked" from the quarry to their stone platforms

Morse Code

Morse code has been in use for more than 160 years — longer than any other electronic encoding system

Thesaurus

The word "thesaurus" comes from a Greek word meaning "treasury"

David Glasgow Farragut

David Glasgow Farragut was the first full admiral in the United States Navy

Marshall Plan

The European Recovery Program was named the Marshall Plan for the U.S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall

Great Rift Valley

The Great Rift Valley is such a significant physical feature on the earth that it is clearly visible from space

Diwali

Diwali, or the "Festival of Lights," is a Hindu celebration signifying the triumph of good over evil

Genghis Khan

Genghis Khan believed that Heaven had commissioned him to establish a world empire

Yugoslavia

The region once occupied by Yugoslavia is often described as "the crossroads between East and West"

Robert K. Merton

Robert K. Merton coined the expression "self-fulfilling prophecy"

Chemosh

Chemosh was the supreme Moabite deity who was believed to bring victory to his people when they honored him properly, but allowed their enemies to prevail when they fell into sin

Forgiveness

Most world religions include teachings on the nature of forgiveness

Abortion

In 1920 under Vladimir Lenin the Soviet Union was the first to legalize all abortions, but this was reversed in 1936 by Joseph Stalin in order to increase population growth.

Mohawk

As original members of the Iroquois League, or Haudenosaunee, the Mohawk were known as the "Keepers of the Eastern Door" who guarded the Iroquois Confederation against invasion from that direction

Elf

The earliest preserved description of elves comes from Norse mythology

Adolf Eichmann

Adolf Eichmann's defense for his crimes against humanity during the Holocaust - that he had abdicated his conscience in order to follow the "Führerprinzip" - inspired the Milgram experiment

Tower of London

Legend says that if the six resident ravens ever leave the Tower of London, the Tower and the British kingdom will fall

Vaclav Havel

Václav Havel was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic

Adultery

In some cultures, adultery was defined as a crime only when a wife had sexual relations with a man who was not her husband; a husband could be unfaithful to his wife without it being considered adultery.

Edward Herbert Thompson

During his time as United States vice-consul to Yucatan, Edward Herbert Thompson purchased the plantation that included the site of the ancient Mayan city of Chichen Itza

Kitty Wells

Kitty Wells' 1952 recording of "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" led to the introduction of female stars in the male-dominated country music genre

James Frazer

James Frazer's distinction between magic and religion has been widely adopted by anthropologists since his time

Cole Porter

Unlike most successful Broadway composers, Cole Porter wrote both the lyrics and the music for his songs

W. H. Auden

Auden was one of the first prominent critics to praise J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Battle of Kursk

The Battle of Kursk, in which the Soviet Red Army defeated Hitler's German troops, was a turning point in World War II, giving the Soviets the strategic initiative on the Eastern Front

Pygmy

The Spanish term "Negrito" (little black) refers to pygmy populations in Asia

Guerrilla warfare

The term guerrillla, from the Spanish "small war," was first used to describe the resistance in Spain against Napoleon

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work after World War I in establishing the League of Nations, although the United States never joined the League

Polygyny

Polygyny, the marital practice in which a man has more than one wife simultaneously, is the most common form of polygamy

Planet

There was no formal scientific definition of "planet" until 2006

Potawatomi

Potawatomi were forced to walk a "Trail of Death" from their homelands in Indiana to an Indian Reservation in Kansas

Acculturation

John Wesley Powell is credited with coining the word acculturation

Benjamin Bloom

The American educational psychologist, Benjamin Bloom, carried out research that showed that a "decade of dedication" is more important than giftedness in achieving success in a given field of learning

Centaur

The idea of centaurs may have arisen when non-riding cultures first saw nomads mounted on horses.

Yoruba People

The Yoruba are one of the largest ethno-linguistic groups in sub-Saharan Africa with "Yorubaland" spanning parts of the modern states of Nigeria, Benin, and Togo

Ming Dynasty

The Great Wall of China was built primarily during the Ming Dynasty (1368 to 1644)

Portia Simpson-Miller

Portia Simpson-Miller was Jamaica's first female Prime Minister

Aurangzeb

During his reign Aurangzeb expanded the Mughal Empire and enacted a series of edicts based on Sharia (Islamic law) in India

Emma of Normandy

The name "Emma" was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife of King Ethelred the Unready of England and then of King Canute the Great of Denmark

John F. Kennedy

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, often referred to by his initials JFK, was the 35th President of the United States, serving from 1961 until his assassination in 1963