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David Livingstone

David Livingstone, the first European to see it, renamed the Mosi-oa-Tunya waterfall the Victoria Falls in honor of Queen Victoria

Polygamy

Even within societies which allow polygamy, in actual practice it generally occurs only rarely.

Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University

Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University, founded in India, teaches that the world is approaching a time of great change which will lead to the Golden Age

Ghetto

Historically, the term "ghetto" referred to restricted housing zones where Jews were required to live

Achomawi

The Pit River is so named because of the pits the Achumawi dug to trap game that came to drink there.

Ajivika

Ajivika was an ancient Indian philosophical and ascetic movement that did not believe in karma or the possibility of free will

Ancient Pueblo Peoples

The ancestors of the Pueblo people built incredible cities, cliff dwellings, along the walls of canyons as well as enormous "great houses" and roads along the valleys

Biome

The British Empire was known as "the empire on which the sun never sets"

Tsimshian

Tsimshian people of the Pacific Northwest lived on salmon, which were plentiful prior to commercial fishing, and used Western Redcedar for most of their needs

Albert Bierstadt

Although Albert Bierstadt's paintings were not fully recognized in his lifetime, he is now regarded as one of the greatest landscape artists in history.

Indus Valley Civilization

The Indus Valley Civilization had an advanced urban culture, with streets laid out in a grid pattern, advanced architecture and impressive sewage and drainage systems

Horse

In the wild, horse societies are matriarchal. At the center of the herd is the alpha or dominant mare (female horse).

Mass

The British Empire was known as "the empire on which the sun never sets"

Freedom of religion

In 1948 the United Nations defined freedom of religion as a universal human right

Jomo Kenyatta

Uhuru Kenyatta, son of the first president of Kenya, Jomo Kenyatta, was elected fourth president in 2013

Esther Williams

"America's Mermaid," Esther Williams, was famous for movies featuring "water ballet" now known as synchronized swimming

Aachen Cathedral

Aachen Cathedral in Germany, built by Charlemagne and his burial site, is the oldest cathedral in Northern Europe

Luanda

Luanda is one of several cities that has been called the "Paris of Africa"

Urbanization

Urbanization can be planned or organic.

Marriage

Traditionally, marriage has been a prerequisite for starting a family, which then serves as the building block of a community and society

Mongol Empire

The Mongol Empire, established by Genghis Khan in 1206, was the largest contiguous land empire in human history

Nineveh

Nineveh was the largest city in the world prior to its destruction in 612 B.C.E.

May Day

In Europe, May Day originated as a pagan holiday celebrating the beginning of summer

Berlin

The Berlin Wall, which had divided the East and West sections of the city since 1945, was demolished in 1989

Pluto

Pluto, considered the solar system's ninth planet since its discovery in 1930, was reclassified as a dwarf planet in 2006

Turbine

The term "turbine" comes from the Latin "turbo" which means vortex

Wovoka

Wovoka, also known as Jack Wilson, was a Paiute shaman who received a vision of peace and instructions on how to perform the Ghost Dance

Edith Stein

Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross was born Edith Stein, a Jew, and died in the Auschwitz concentration camp

Violin

Violin makers are called "luthiers"

Barbershop music

Barbershop music is a four-part a cappella style of singing famous for its "ringing" chords in which an overtone is produced that sounds like a fifth note

Yelena Bonner

Yelena Bonner continued her activism in support of human rights in Russia after the death of her husband Andrei Sakharov, and the break up of the Soviet Union, until her death in 2011

Abydos, Egypt

So rare is a full list of pharaoh names that the Table of Abydos has been called the "Rosetta Stone" of Egyptian archaeology

Aryabhata

The Indian mathematician and astronomer Aryabhata calculated Pi (π) correct to five digits, and may have realized that it is an irrational number

Shinto

Shinto is commonly translated as "the Way of the Gods"

Abiathar

When Abiathar escaped from King Saul and fled to David he brought the sacred ephod, which he used on several occasions to provide David with crucial advice from God

Ljubljana

The symbol of the city of Ljubljana is the dragon, which is found in the coat of arms, on top of the tower of the Ljubljana Castle, and on the Dragon Bridge

Great Pyramid of Giza

The Great Pyramid was the world's tallest building for four millennia

Che Guevara

Socialist revolutionary Che Guevara was born in Argentina and received the nickname "Che" because of his frequent use of the Argentine word Che, meaning "pal" or "mate"

Chinese dragon

Unlike the Western dragon of Europe that is representative of evil, the many Eastern versions of the dragon are powerful spiritual symbols, representing seasonal cycles and supernatural forces.

Didgeridoo

The didgeridoo is commonly claimed to be the world's oldest wind instrument

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