Info:Did you know


Egypt

Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and the second-most populous on the African Continent

Nagaland

In Nagaland, a small state in India, over 90 percent of the population are Christian, predominantly Baptist

Toby Riddle

Toby Winema Riddle, one of few Native American women to be so honored, received a military pension by congressional act acknowledging her role as a key participant and mediator during peace and war

Acadia National Park

Acadia National Park in Maine was the first National Park established east of the Mississippi River

Battle of the Alamo

The deaths of such popular figures as Davy Crockett and Jim Bowie contributed to how the Battle of the Alamo has been regarded as an heroic and iconic moment in Texan and U.S. history

Picts

The Picts - "painted people" - were ancient inhabitants of Scotland who lived north of Hadrian's Wall

Wild Bill Hickok

Wild Bill Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker in Deadwood, in what is now South Dakota

Mongol Empire

The Mongol Empire, established by Genghis Khan in 1206, was the largest contiguous land empire in human history

Tower of London

Legend says that if the six resident ravens ever leave the Tower of London, the Tower and the British kingdom will fall

Kimono

"Kimono" in Japanese means "something worn" or "clothes"

Kitty Wells

Kitty Wells' 1952 recording of "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" led to the introduction of female stars in the male-dominated country music genre

Nigeria

Nigeria has experienced very high population growth and is now the most populous country in Africa

Oak

Oak used for wine barrels increases the antioxidant activity of the wines

Seminole

The Florida Seminoles are the only American Indian tribe never to sign a formal peace treaty with the United States

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann was the first to bring the phrase "Cold War" to common currency in his 1947 book by the same name

Head Start

The Head Start program was initated as part of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty

Bedouin

Traditional Bedouin nomadic culture is noted for generous hospitality and protection of woman, as well as violent conflicts and tribal justice

Battle of Normandy

Bad weather before D-Day gave the Allied troops the element of surprise

Ahilyabai Holkar

Ahilyabai Holkar was one of India's great women rulers

Aurangzeb

During his reign Aurangzeb expanded the Mughal Empire and enacted a series of edicts based on Sharia (Islamic law) in India

Tipi

For the Plains Indians, the tipi was more than just a home—it was a sacred space.

John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury

John Lubbock became Lord Avebury in recognition of his efforts to preserve the Avebury archaeological site

Eskimo

Those previously referred to as "Eskimo" include both Inuit and Yupik cultures

Kiowa

Kiowa ledger art originated in the captive Kiowa artists' use of the white man's record keeping books (ledgers) to preserve their history using traditional pictographic representations

Jozef Tiso

Jozef Tiso is regarded by some as a hero who protected Slovakia during World War II and by others as a traitor who collaborated with the Nazis

Kibbutz

Kibbutz members took pleasure in bringing the land back to life by planting trees, draining swamps, and countless other activities to make the land more fertile.

Passamaquoddy

Passamaquoddy are known for their arts and crafts, such as jewelry, basketry, wood carving, and building birch bark canoes

Grameen Bank

Grameen Bank and Muhammad Yunus were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for the initiation of microcredit

Francis Drake

Sir Francis Drake was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the Earth and the second to complete such a voyage overall, after [[Ferdinand Magellan

Michael Argyle (psychologist)

Michael Argyle suggested the idea that social skills can be learned

Cloud seeding

The first attempt at cloud seeding was in 1946 when dry ice dropped from a plane led to snow fall

Johan Huizinga

Johan Huizinga suggested that the essential quality of human beings is playfulness

George Steinbrenner

George Steinbrenner changed the manager of the New York Yankees twenty times during his first twenty-three seasons.

Constantinople

In the Middle Ages, Constantinople was the richest European city and was known as the "Queen of Cities"

Malawi

Malawi is known as the "Warm Heart of Africa."

Italian Fascism

The term "Fascism" derives from fasces, a bundle of rods used in the Roman Empire to symbolize strength through unity

B. B. King

B. B. King's favorite singer was Frank Sinatra

Colin Cherry

Colin Cherry was the first to study the "cocktail party effect" which is the human ability to follow a single conversation in the midst of other conversations and background noises

Photojournalism

The "golden age" of photojournalism was in the 1930s to 1950s

John Cage

The twentieth century composer John Cage is best known for his composition 4'33", whose three movements are performed without a single note being played