List of birds

This page lists living orders and families of birds, class Aves.

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. The Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy offers a different classification.

This article and the descendant family articles follow the taxonomy of the Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds (HANZAB) for families largely endemic to that region, and otherwise the Handbook of Birds of the World (HBW).

Paleognathae

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae (or “old jaws”), one of the two evolutionary "super orders."

  • Struthioniformes: mainly southern hemisphere; 12 species, two extinct
  • Tinamiformes: South America; 45 species
    • Tinamidae: tinamous

Neognathae

Nearly all living birds belong to the super order of Neognathae— or 'new jaws'. With their keels, unlike the ratites, they are known as carinates. The passerines alone account for well over five thousand species.

  • Anseriformes: worldwide; 150 species
    • Anhimidae: screamers
    • Anseranatidae: Magpie-goose
    • Anatidae: swans, geese and ducks
  • Galliformes: worldwide except northern Eurasia; 256 species
    • Megapodidae: mound-builders
    • Cracidae: chachalacas, guans and curassows
    • Tetraonidae: grouse
    • Phasianidae: partridges, pheasants, quail and allies
    • Odontophoridae: New World quails
    • Numididae: guineafowl
    • Meleagrididae: turkeys
    • Mesitornithidae: mesites
  • Sphenisciformes: Antarctic and southern waters; 16 species
  • Gaviiformes: North America, Eurasia; five species
    • Gaviidae: loons or divers
  • Podicipediformes: worldwide; 20 species
    • Podicipedidae: grebes
  • Procellariiformes: pan-oceanic; 93 species
    • Diomedeidae: albatrosses
    • Procellariidae: fulmars, prions, shearwaters, gadfly and other petrels
    • Pelecanoididae: diving petrels
    • Hydrobatidae: storm petrels
  • Pelecaniformes: worldwide; 57 species
    • Pelecanidae: pelicans
    • Sulidae: gannets and boobies
    • Phalacrocoracidae: cormorants
    • Fregatidae: frigatebirds
    • Anhingidae: Anhinga and darters
    • Phaethontidae: tropicbirds
  • Ciconiiformes: all continents; 115 species
  • Accipitriformes: worldwide; about 226 species. Some classifications also include the Falconidae.
    • Cathartidae: New World vultures and condors
    • Pandionidae: osprey
    • Accipitridae: hawks, eagles, buzzards and Old World vultures, harriers, kites, and allies
    • Sagittaridae: secretary bird
  • Falconiformes: worldwide; 60 species. Sometimes included in the Accipitriformes.
  • Turniciformes: Old World, 15 species
    • Turnicidae: buttonquail
  • Gruiformes: worldwide; 196 species
    • Gruidae: cranes
    • Aramidae: Limpkin
    • Psophiidae: trumpeters
    • Rallidae: rails, crakes, coots and allies
    • Heliornithidae: finfoots and Sungrebe
    • Rhynochetidae: Kagu
    • Eurypigidae: Sunbittern
    • Cariamidae: seriemas
    • Otidae: bustards
  • Charadriiformes: worldwide; 305 species
    • Jacanidae: jacanas
    • Rostratulidae: painted snipe
    • Haematopodidae: oystercatchers
    • Charadriidae: plovers
    • Pluvianellidae: Magellanic Plover
    • Ibidorhynchidae: Ibisbill
    • Recurvirostridae: avocets and stilts
    • Scolopacidae: typical waders or shorebirds
    • Dromadidae: Crab Plover
    • Burhinidae: thick-knees
    • Glareolidae: coursers and pratincoles
    • Thinocoridae: seedsnipe
    • Pedionomidae: Plains Wanderer
    • Chionididae: sheathbill
    • Stercorariidae: skuas
    • Laridae: gulls
    • Sternidae: terns
    • Rhynchopidae: skimmers
    • Alcidae: auks
  • Pterocliformes: Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species
    • Pteroclidae: sandgrouse
  • Columbiformes: worldwide; 300 species
  • Psittaciformes: pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species
    • Cacatuidae: cockatoos
    • Psittacidae: parrots
  • Cuculiformes: worldwide; 151 species
    • Musophagidae: turacos and allies
    • Cuculidae: cuckoos
    • Opisthocomidae: Hoatzin
  • Strigiformes: worldwide; 134 species
    • Tytonidae: barn owls
    • Strigidae: typical owls
  • Caprimulgiformes: worldwide; 96 species
    • Steatornithidae: Oilbird
    • Podargidae: frogmouths
    • Nyctibiidae: potoos
    • Aegothelidae: owlet-nightjars
    • Caprimulgidae: nightjars
  • Apodiformes: worldwide; 403 species
    • Apodidae: swifts
    • Hemiprocnidae: tree swifts
  • Trochiliformes
  • Coliiformes: Sub-Saharan Africa; six species
    • Coliidae: mousebirds
  • Trogoniformes: Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species
    • Trogonidae: trogons and quetzals
  • Coraciiformes: worldwide; 192 species
    • Alcedinidae: river kingfishers
    • Halcyonidae: tree kingfishers
    • Cerylidae: water or belted kingfishers
    • Todidae: todies
    • Momotidae: motmots
    • Meropidae: bee-eaters
    • Leptosomatidae: Cuckoo Roller
    • Brachypteraciidae: ground rollers
    • Coraciidae: rollers
    • Upupidae: Hoopoe
    • Phoeniculidae: woodhoopoes
    • Bucerotidae: hornbills
  • Piciformes: worldwide except Australasia; 376 species
    • Galbulidae: jacamars
    • Bucconidae: puffbirds
    • Capitonidae: barbets
    • Indicatoridae: honeyguides
    • Ramphastidae: toucans
    • Picidae: woodpeckers
  • Passeriformes: worldwide; about 5,200 species
    • Suborder Tyranni ("suboscines")
    • Tyrannidae: tyrant flycatchers
    • Acanthisittidae: New Zealand wrens
    • Pittidae: pittas
    • Eurylaimidae: broadbills
    • Dendrocolaptidae: woodcreepers
    • Furnariidae: ovenbirds
    • Thamnophilidae: antbirds
    • Formicariidae: antpittas and antthrushes
    • Conopophagidae: gnateaters
    • Rhinocryptidae: tapaculos
    • Cotingidae: cotingas
    • Pipridae: manakins
    • Philepittidae: asities
    • Suborder Passeri ("oscines")
    • Atrichornithidae: scrub-birds
    • Menuridae: lyrebirds
    • Turnagridae: Piopio
    • Alaudidae: larks
    • Hirundinidae: swallows
    • Motacillidae: wagtails and pipits
    • Campephagidae: cuckoo-shrikes
    • Pycnonotidae: bulbuls
    • Regulidae: kinglets
    • Chloropseidae: leafbirds
    • Aegithinidae: ioras
    • Ptilogonatidae: silky-flycatchers
    • Bombycillidae: waxwings
    • Hypocoliidae: hypocolius
    • Dulidae: Palmchat
    • Cinclidae: dippers
    • Troglodytidae: wrens
    • Mimidae: mockingbirds, thrashers and gray catbird
    • Prunellidae: accentors
    • Turdidae: thrushes and allies
    • Cisticolidae: cisticolas and allies
    • Sylviidae: Old World warblers
    • Polioptilidae: gnatcatchers
    • Muscicapidae: Old World flycatchers
    • Platysteiridae: wattle-eyes
    • Petroicidae: Australasian robins
    • Pachycephalidae: whistlers and allies
    • Picathartidae: rockfowl
    • Timaliidae: babblers
    • Pomatostomidae: pseudo-babblers
    • Paradoxornithidae: parrotbills
    • Orthonychidae: logrunner and chowchilla
    • Cinclosomatidae: whipbirds and quail-thrushes
    • Aegithalidae: long-tailed tits
    • Maluridae: fairy-wrens, emu-wrens and grasswrens
    • Neosittidae: sitellas
    • Climacteridae: Australasian treecreepers
    • Paridae: chickadees and tits
    • Sittidae: nuthatches
    • Tichodromidae: Wallcreeper
    • Certhiidae: treecreepers
    • Rhabdornithidae: Philippine creepers
    • Remizidae: penduline tits
    • Nectariniidae: sunbirds and spiderhunters
    • Melanocharitidae: berrypeckers and longbills
    • Paramythiidae: tit berrypecker and crested berrypeckers
    • Dicaeidae: flowerpeckers
    • Pardalotidae: pardalotes, thornbills and alies
    • Zosteropidae: white-eyes
    • Promeropidae: sugarbirds
    • Meliphagidae: honeyeaters and chats
    • Oriolidae: Old World orioles
    • Irenidae: fairy-bluebirds
    • Laniidae: shrikes
    • Malaconotidae: bushshrikes and allies
    • Prionopidae: helmetshrikes
    • Vangidae: vangas
    • Dicruridae: drongos
    • Callaeidae: wattlebirds
    • Corcoracidae: White-winged chough and Apostlebird
    • Artamidae: currawongs, woodswallows, butcherbirds & allies
    • Pityriaseidae: bristlehead
    • Paradisaeidae: birds-of-paradise
    • Ptilonorhynchidae: bowerbirds
    • Corvidae: crows, jays and magpies
    • Sturnidae: starlings
    • Passeridae: Old World sparrows
    • Ploceidae: weavers and allies
    • Estrildidae: waxbills and allies
    • Viduidae: indigobirds
    • Vireonidae: vireos and allies
    • Fringillidae: finches, crossbills and allies
    • Drepanididae: Hawaiian honeycreepers
    • Peucedramidae: Olive warbler
    • Parulidae: New World warblers
    • Coerebidae: Bananaquit
    • Thraupidae: tanagers and allies
    • Emberizidae: buntings, seedeaters and allies
    • Cardinalidae: saltators, cardinals and allies
    • Icteridae: troupials and allies

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