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The pyramid "El Castillo" at Chichen Itza was constructed so that on the equinoxes the rising and setting sun casts a shadow in the shape of a plumed serpent, representing the feathered-serpent god Kukulcan or Quetzalcoatl, that slides down th (read more)

Featured Article: Bob Dylan

Dylan in 1984
Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, poet, and disc jockey who has been a major figure in U.S. culture for more than half a century.

Much of Dylan's most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became an informal chronicler and a reluctant figurehead of American unrest. A number of his songs, such as "Blowin' in the Wind" and "The Times They Are a-Changin'" became anthems of the anti-war and civil rights movements. His later work has shown steadfast devotion to many traditions of American song, from folk and country/blues to gospel, rock and roll, and rockabilly, to English, Scottish, and Irish folk music, even jazz and swing.

Although his accomplishments as performer and recording artist have been central to his career, his songwriting is generally regarded as his greatest contribution. Compositions such as "Like a Rolling Stone," "Mr. Tambourine Man," "You've Got To Serve Somebody," and many others earned him the reputation as the most influential singer-songwriter of the twentieth century. Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2016 "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition."

Popular Article: Sun Myung Moon

Reverend Sun Myung Moon
Sun Myung Moon (문선명, 文鮮明), (February 25, 1920 (lunar: January 6, 1920) – September 3, 2012), was born in North Pyeongan Province, which is now part of North Korea. He founded the Unification Church (known formally as The Holy Spirit Association for the Unification of World Christianity, founded May 1, 1954, Seoul, Korea; with missions and centers in 185 countries) in 1954, the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, August 1, 1996, and the Universal Peace Federation in 2005, in New York City. He is also well-known for holding, since 1960, Blessing Ceremonies, which are often called "mass weddings," and for founding The Washington Times newspaper in 1982.

Reverend Moon was a prolific speaker, his writings filling over 400 volumes, and his original religious teachings are published as the Exposition of the Divine Principle (1996).

More than just a religious leader, Moon founded and supported dozens of organizations to advance international understanding and build lasting peace in the world. A long-time opponent of totalitarian communism, Moon developed a systematic ideological critique and counterproposal to communism, which he propagated through the world in the 1970s and 1980s and which strengthened the resolve of anti-communist elements in numerous front-line states. Since the demise of the Soviet Union, he was an ardent supporter of reconstruction in post-communist societies and invested heavily in the development of North Korea. Other examples of his diverse humanitarian efforts include founding The Little Angels children's dance troupe as Korean cultural ambassadors, developing fish-based protein supplement to fight hunger and malnutrition, organizing numerous interfaith conferences to foster cooperation among religions, proposing the establishment an inter-religious council at the United Nations, and advocating a tunnel across the Bering Strait to unite the world's nations by an international highway.