Definition: Creed

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Etymology

From Middle English crede, from Old English crēda, crēdo, from Latin crēdō (I believe), from Proto-Italic *krezdō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱred dʰeh₁- (to place one's heart, i.e., to trust, believe), a compound phrase of the oblique case form of *ḱḗr (heart). Creed is cognate with Old Irish cretim (to believe), Sanskrit श्रद्दधाति or śráddadhāti (to have faith or faithfulness, to have belief or confidence, believe).

Noun

creed (plural creeds)

  1. That which is believed; accepted doctrine, especially religious doctrine; a particular set of beliefs; any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
  2. (religion) A reading or statement of belief that summarizes the faith it represents; a confession of faith for public use, especially one which is brief and comprehensive.
    A creed is a manifesto of religious or spiritual beliefs

Nicene Creed

Derived terms

Related terms

  • credal
  • credence
  • credendum
  • credent
  • credential
  • credenza
  • credibility
  • credible
  • credit
  • creditable
  • creditor
  • credo
  • credobaptism
  • credobaptist
  • credulity
  • credulous

Verb

creed (third-person singular simple present creeds, present participle creeding, simple past and past participle creeded)

  1. To provide with a creed.

Credits

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